THE ARCHITECTURE OF DEVOTION ARTISTS

Sheena Rae Dowling and Erich Gerhard Winzer
We collect stuff. We like old things, rusty things, abandoned houses, blurry photos, fabric, hair, used things, and goofy junk. We like contradictions. One day we want to build an abandoned house of our own and live there. We are the protectors of the mundane objects people like to call garbage. This piece implies value in what is over looked or cast off. It relates to idea of a relic and its potential energy as an inanimate object. There are references to religious rituals as well as practices related to voodoo and more mythologically based ideas. There is a sense of alchemy and creation as well as decay. We look for ways to create grotesques beauty and organized chaos.

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Matthew Shelley
Matthew Shelley is from the Pacific Northwest and did his undergraduate work at the University of Oregon. His studio practice contemplates the relationship of the past to the present, the psychology of memory, how we intake experience and how time affects those experiences. The work displayed here is involved with recollection, exaggeration and the indeterminate. Matthew recently earned his MFA from American University and currently lives in Brooklyn, NY. More of his work can be seen at matthewgshelley.com.

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Maria Berrio
Born in Bogotá, Colombia in 1982, Maria Berrio has been residing in New York City since 2000. She currently works and lives in Brooklyn since obtaining her BFA at Parsons School of Design in 2004, and MFA at the School of Visual Arts in 2007. Berrio’s work has been showcased in numerous New York City galleries including Praxis International, Chelsea Museum, and the Art Directors Club. Nationally, she has presented her work in San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Boston, and Miami – where she exhibited in Art Basel 2009. Berrio has also displayed her work internationally in Bogotá and will be presenting works at an upcoming exhibit in Vermont at the Green and Blue Gallery. Berrio was recently awarded residency at Chashama in Brooklyn and is currently commissioned with CityArts to create a mural in Harlem. More of her work can be seen at mariaberrio.com.

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Konstantin Sergeyev
Konstantin Sergeyev was born in the Second World, and was brought to the First at the age of twelve. Since then he’s been attracted to the sorts of people who don’t think much of this place, and has been trying to document their lifestyles. Feel free to judge the merit of these attempts at www.konstphoto.com.

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Michael Solomon
Michael Solomon says: I lived in Cobble Hill from 1980 through the early 90’s and took off on a journey to find my creative voice. Along the way I exhibited at top art shows in Chicago, Washington DC and Florida and his work adorns homes and restaurants coast to coast. The showing at the Gowanus Ballroom is Michael’s first Brooklyn showing since joining, Josh Young at Serett Metal.

My signature stained glass mosaics have hand cut shard pieces as borders around mirrors, elements within paintings or are raised surfaces on faux metal patina boards. The work always has strong contrasts and bold palates. There are NO limitations to locations for my organic art. Custom work is always considered – reflectiveart.com.

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Black Paw Photo
Black Paw Photo is a two person team of photographers based out of Staten Island, New York comprised of Anthony Caccamo and Orsolya Soos. Using the eyes of two artists, Orsi and Anthony create a diverse selection of natural and artistic photographs for every project. They have a candid, photojournalistic style because they believe it is the only way to capture natural and special images that show the truth behind their subjects. Remaining invisible to their subjects, they document unspoiled moments that otherwise may have gone unnoticed. The photographs they have chosen for the 2011 Art + Architecture Show reflect the varied crossings of architecture, space, and living things and the mutual influence they have on one another. In addition to pursuing photography for the sake of art, Anthony and Orsi also run a photography business. More of their work can be found at http://www.blackpawphoto.com.

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Andrew Smenos
Graduate of The Ringling School of Art and Design, Andrew Smenos is a painter and sculptor. His work has been featured in numerous publications including The New York Times, Reuters and National Public Radio. Andrew lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

The current work consists of paintings and sculptures involving homemade, hand stitched fabric and hand carved wooden animals. The work deals with contrasting metaphors and individual perspective.

More of Andrew’s work can be found at his website, www.andrewsmenos.com.

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Nancy Nicholson
Since graduating from the Boston Museum School in 1985, Nancy has worked professionally as a stained glass artist. Her signature work is an ongoing series of cityscape panels that explores the layering of light, color and dynamic forms of the urban environment. Nancy also designs and creates custom work for numerous environments including private homes, corporate offices, restaurants and schools. More of Nancy’s work can be found at her website, www.nancy-nicholson.com.

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Abby Hertz

Abby Hertz (stage name Lady C) is a visual and performance artist living in Brooklyn. Her paintings and drawings have been shown in several group shows in Manhattan and Brooklyn, including Causey Contemporary Gallery in Williamsburg.

She performs fire all over the world with her husband Flambeaux and their fire arts company Flambeaux Fire. Some of their clients have included The Alexander Calder Estate, Lola Schnabel, and the Detroit Institute of Art.

Photo credits: Alex Erisoty & Saad Kahn

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Matthew Robinson

Originally from Connecticut, lives in Clinton Hill. “I construct mixed media paintings of weathered industrial environments. These environments represent formalism, de-evolution, and post-industry. They suggest a misconception of ‘progress’, circular human behavior and a denial of history. The paintings document realities in-between the past and present. The result appears futuristic and acknowledges entropy of all things physical.” You can see more on his website.

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Adrian Landon
Adrian Landon grew up in New York City and attended the Lycee Francais de New York. After a year of Industrial Design at the Academy of Art in San Francisco, he traveled through the States to explore the nature and wildlife of the great american west, ranging from the amazing deserts of Arizona and the southwest, to the Beautiful and still dry Sierra Nevada mountain ranges of California, and the overwhelmingly rich rocky mountains of Colorado. He returned to the city in April 2009 and began to learn the craft of welding and forging at The Arts Students League. He is now a New York based artist and also works as a violin maker with his father Christophe Landon. More work can be found at his website, adrianlandon.com.

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Amy Consolo

Amy is a New York based illustrator and fine artist whose combined mastery at manipulating perspective to create unreal but incredible spaces, and unnerving fascination with the macabre, enable her to create stunningly intricate (but somehow adorable?) nightmare worlds that are impossible to look away from. Featured in this show is a new large scale drawing, a 6 foot piece inked almost entirely in micron pens so that no detail, no matter how minuscule, is overlooked. Amy graduated from Parsons School of Design in 2007 with a BFA in Illustration. More of her work can be seen at www.amyconsolo.com

Details from “The Boogey Man” below…

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Naho Taruishi
Born in Tokyo, Japan, Naho Taruishi lives and works in New York. Her single-channel videos and installations have been shown at Exit Art, Dumbo Arts Center, Visual Arts Gallery, P.C.O.G Gallery, Ise Cultural Foundation, Artists Space and Brooklyn Artists Gym in New York. Taruishi also has participated in numerous international film/video art festivals at Goethe-Institut, Park Tower Hall, Yokohama Museum of Art, Aichi Arts Center and Fukuoka City Public Library in Japan, Forest City Gallery in Canada, Matadero Madrid in Spain, and art channel in France. Her collaborative video works with several Tokyo-based video artists have been collected by The Video Art Foundation and the Video Dictionary in UK and Spain. Taruishi has been awarded the Honor Award in Fine Arts and the Fine Arts Special Departmental Award from the School of Visual Arts in New York.

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David Aronson
David Aronson is a Brooklyn Based Painter whose photographically inspired oil paintings exalt characters he interacts with on his urban gallivanting.

Exaltation has been called a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion; others define it by the elevation of a person to the status of a god. In this series, the artist explores both options in order to comment upon the subject’s elevation and the viewer’s emotional response. The portraits are about finding something to believe in. Painting has a grand legacy of representing figures of worship. Some choose to worship exalted figures, while others worship the feeling of exaltation. An organic selection process allows for a casual environment opening communication and revealing mutual understanding between artist and subject. These figures do not exist in a particular setting. They are an honest, yet biased interpretation of a physical manifestation of a soul chosen for exaltation.

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Derek Gregory
Making art and finding peace from shattered remnants and pieces of the past best describes Derek Gregory’s walk through life..

Growing up a military brat and serving in the navy for 20 years offered a contrast of influences, places and experiences; coming home developed and became a practice of going within. When discovering and teaching himself stained glass in 2004 he found a quiet meditative peace and light in the contrasting cold, smooth, impartial glass. Never fully fitting into the rigid environment he’d been immersed within for over thirty years of his life, he drifted into non-traditional methods and materials and finding they expressed a more truthful inner sense of grittiness amidst the intensity of saturated experience.


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