Can creeping fig be used as ground cover?

Creeping fig (Ficus pumila) is a fast-growing vine that can be used to soften the look of concrete garden walls. The plant’s wandering stems and small leaves create an interesting lacy pattern as the vine grows across the wall. It can also be used as a groundcover.

Can creeping fig be used as ground cover?

Creeping fig (Ficus pumila) is a fast-growing vine that can be used to soften the look of concrete garden walls. The plant’s wandering stems and small leaves create an interesting lacy pattern as the vine grows across the wall. It can also be used as a groundcover.

Does Ficus pumila damage walls?

Creeping Fig Ficus pumila is a good one for effectively covering up walls. It’s a self clinger, using aerial roots, which can be a bit of a problem when it pulls away because it does leave its mark on the paintwork.

Where do you put the Ficus pumila?

A ficus pumila needs indirect light from an east or west-facing window. Plants with variegated leaves require even more light. Creeping fig plants do surprisingly well in strong artificial light.

Is creeping fig slow growing?

Initially, in the first year, creeping fig will grow slowly, if at all. In year two, it will begin to grow and climb. By year three you may wish you hadn’t planted it. By this time, it will grow and climb in leaps and bounds.

Does creeping fig need a trellis?

A charming climber with small, heart-shaped leaves, creeping fig (Ficus pumila) will cover unsightly cement, stucco or brick buildings. As it climbs with the help of aerial roots, it doesn’t need wires or a trellis. It shouldn’t be used on wood walls, however, which its sticky tendrils can damage.

How far apart do you plant Ficus pumila?

This fast-spreading vine requires at least 10 feet of vertical clearance and 3 feet of horizontal space. Indoor use is commonly relegated to growing the plant on a trellis to decorate a side wall within a living room or hallway.

How do you replant a Ficus pumila?

Growing Ficus Pumila in a pot Remove the shrub from the container, gently tease the roots. Position in hole and backfill with potting mix, gently firming down. Water in well. Feed every 1 to 2 weeks with Yates Thrive Roses & Flowers Liquid Plant Food.

Does Ficus pumila have invasive roots?

Creeping fig roots can be highly invasive, cracking and lifting up patios and foundations. Root diameter can reach 4 inches and creeping fig will eventually cover shaded, adjoining lawn.

Does creeping fig attract rats?

Pet food and ivy are also a lure for them. Rats will even eat grass seed, bird seed and pet droppings. Roof rats like to establish nests in many of our most common backyard plants such as Algerian ivy, bougainvillea, cape honeysuckle, creeping fig, Italian cypress, natal plum, palm trees, oleander and yucca.

Can ficus pumila grow in shade?

It’s young leaves are heart shaped and grow quickly, making it an ideal plant to use to cover up any unsightly walls or large open garden spaces. It is shade tolerant and extremely hard wearing once established.

What is creeping fig (Ficus pumila)?

Creeping fig ( Ficus pumila) is a fast-growing vine that can be used to soften the look of concrete garden walls. The plant’s wandering stems and small leaves create an interesting lacy pattern as the vine grows across the wall.

Can creeping fig be used as a groundcover?

The plant’s wandering stems and small leaves create an interesting lacy pattern as the vine grows across the wall. It can also be used as a groundcover. Creeping fig can be planted in sun or shade, and it has a good tolerance to salt spray.

How much water does creeping fig need?

When grown outdoors, creeping fig like full or part shade and grows best in well-draining soil. In order to look its best, creeping fig should get about 2 inches (5 cm.) of water a week. If you do not get this much rainfall in a week, you will need to supplement with the hose. Creeping fig is easily propagated from plant divisions.

What does a fig tree look like from the outside?

When grown outdoors, pear-shaped to cylindrical fig, mostly solitary, may appear throughout the year. They are green with white flecks maturing to purple, densely hairy, and 2.5 inches long by 1.5 inches wide. Flowers and fruits rarely appear on indoor plants.