What does regiment of spite mean?

He refers to it as “green spears” and “regiment of spite” which suggests that the nettles are like a rival army/enemy. This shows the battles the father has to go through to protect his son and like being in the army he would have to fight his way through to help his son out.

What does regiment of spite mean?

He refers to it as “green spears” and “regiment of spite” which suggests that the nettles are like a rival army/enemy. This shows the battles the father has to go through to protect his son and like being in the army he would have to fight his way through to help his son out.

What is the nettle poem about?

What is it about? The poem is a short account of the day that the poet’s son was stung by nettles – and what happened afterwards. But more interesting than the events are the shadows of war that linger in the mind of the ex-soldier father, causing him to meditate on the cyclical nature of pain and violence.

What is the theme of nettles by Vernon Scannell?

The poem considers the relationship between parent and child, and how a parent strives to ensure the safety of their child. Childhood: The poem acknowledges that children will inevitably feel types of pain and come across certain hardships when growing up.

What do Nettles represent?

In Norse myth, nettles are associated with Thor, the god of Thunder; and with Loki, the trickster god, whose magical fishing net is made from them.

When was Nettles written?

Nettles (Published 1980) War Scannell’s ​perspective on war​can be seen in his poem. The use of the ​semantic field of violence​and the military suggests war influenced the way Scannell viewed the world around him.

What is the extended metaphor in nettles?

The extended metaphor a battle with the speaker of the poem shows how dangerous they are. A regiment is high let organised that consists of many soldiers that suggests a vast number of nettles which could cause a lot of pain.

Is nettle bed a metaphor?

In this case, the nettlebed is a ​metaphor for life​.

How does Scannell present childhood in nettles?

Youth and Innocence In contrast to the ​semantic field of violence​, Scannell uses ​imagery of purity​to describe the son. He presents the relationship between parent and child as one of comfort and safety. After getting stung, the boy ​“came seeking comfort”​, portraying his parents as his safe haven.

Is green spears a metaphor?

The metaphor ‘green spears’ is the first military reference in the poem. They look reminiscent of the lines of spears being held by soldiers in ancient battle scenes. The nettles are dangerous in the same way as the spears. The flat surface will not harm but the edges are razor-sharp.

Who is the speaker in the poem nettles?

Therefore, ​’Nettles’​ is a ​dramatic monologue​. As Scannell was a father himself, it is logical to assume the poem is, at least partially, autobiographical​. This would make the ​speaker​Scannell himself – or, at least, a father.

What does watery grin mean?

The oxymoron “watery grin” suggests both sadness and some cheerfulness pouring through at the same time. Grin is a synonym for smile which indicates how happy he is.

What is a nettle bed?

Filters. An area of land occupied by growing nettles.

What is the meaning of spite?

verb (used with object), spit·ed, spit·ing. to treat with spite or malice. to annoy or thwart, out of spite. to fill with spite; vex; offend. 1 malevolence, maliciousness, rancor, venom, spleen. What’s The Difference Between “Spite” And “Despite”?

What do you mean by Regiment?

English Language Learners Definition of regiment (Entry 1 of 2) : a military unit that is usually made of several large groups of soldiers (called battalions)

What is the verb for spit?

verb (used with object), spit·ed, spit·ing. to treat with spite or malice. to annoy or thwart, out of spite. to fill with spite; vex; offend.

What does’spite’mean?

to annoy or thwart, out of spite. to fill with spite; vex; offend. 1 malevolence, maliciousness, rancor, venom, spleen. What’s The Difference Between “Spite” And “Despite”?