What is GL trading?

A general ledger (GL) is a set of numbered accounts a business uses to keep track of its financial transactions and to prepare financial reports. Each account is a unique record summarizing a specific type of asset, liability, equity, revenue or expense.

What is GL trading?

A general ledger (GL) is a set of numbered accounts a business uses to keep track of its financial transactions and to prepare financial reports. Each account is a unique record summarizing a specific type of asset, liability, equity, revenue or expense.

Who owns GL Trade?

SunGard
GL TRADE was founded by Louis Christophe Laurent and Pierre Gatignol in 1987. The company was acquired by SunGard in July 2008 and now operates as SunGard’s Global Trading segment.

What is meant by GL?

(text messaging) Good luck.

What is GL account in banking?

General ledger accounts encompass all the transaction data needed to produce the income statement, balance sheet, and other financial reports. General ledger transactions are a summary of transactions made as journal entries to sub-ledger accounts.

What is GL and CC?

GL is a FI object and used for external reporting, whereas cost centers are CO objects and used for internal management reporting.

How many GL accounts should a company have?

GL Accounts are typically not changed very much unless there are significant changes in your business model. It would be common to add one or two GL accounts per year but not at a frequency much greater than this. Accounting Seed recommends naming your GL Accounts with numbers followed by a dash and text.

What is GL cost?

General Ledger (GL) Cost Analysis enables managers and analysts to quickly access the transactional data behind GL journal entries and investigate and analyze critical cost and revenue information to improve expense management and organizational profitability.

What is a subledger account?

A subledger is a ledger containing all of a detailed sub-set of transactions. The total of the transactions in the subledger roll up into the general ledger. For example, a subledger may contain all accounts receivable, or accounts payable, or fixed asset transactions.