What is Kurtz paper in Heart of Darkness?

He has written a seventeen-page document on the suppression of savage customs, to be disseminated in Europe, but his supposed desire to “civilize” the natives is strikingly contradicted by his postscript, “Exterminate all the brutes!” Marlow is careful to tell his listeners that there was something wrong with Kurtz.

What is Kurtz paper in Heart of Darkness?

He has written a seventeen-page document on the suppression of savage customs, to be disseminated in Europe, but his supposed desire to “civilize” the natives is strikingly contradicted by his postscript, “Exterminate all the brutes!” Marlow is careful to tell his listeners that there was something wrong with Kurtz.

What papers did Kurtz give Marlow?

A bespectacled representative of the Company comes to retrieve the packet of papers Kurtz entrusted to Marlow, but Marlow will give him only the pamphlet on the “Suppression of Savage Customs,” with the postscript (the handwritten “Exterminate all the brutes!”) torn off.

What was Kurtz written at the end of his paper?

However, over the course of his stay in Africa, Kurtz becomes corrupted. He takes his pamphlet and scribbles in, at the very end, the words “Exterminate all the brutes!” He induces the natives to worship him, setting up rituals and venerations worthy of a tyrant.

Why Kurtz give papers to Marlow?

Marlow is slowly becoming ill, and the work is hard on him. Kurtz seems troubled, probably because the delay has made him realize that he probably will not make it back to Europe alive. Worried that the manager will gain control of his “legacy,” Kurtz gives Marlow a bundle of papers for safekeeping.

What is Kurtz identity?

In Joseph Conrad’s classic novella, Heart of Darkness, the identity of Kurtz is unknown for most of the story. For the majority of the story, Marlow’s image of Kurtz is based solely on hearsay from other Europeans. He is a seemingly extraordinary man who wants to civilize the natives of the area.

What do Kurtz last words mean?

During his time spent in Africa, Kurtz becomes corrupt and writes the words “Exterminate all the brutes!” Here he refers to his own and his comrade’s brutality in Africa, which was carried out in the name of progress and civilization.

What does Marlow do with Kurtz’s letters?

Marlow refuses, but he does give the official a copy of Kurtz’s report to The Society for the Suppression of Savage Customs with Kurtz’s chilling postscript (“Exterminate all the brutes!”) torn off. He learns that Kurtz’s mother had died after being nursed by Kurtz’s “Intended,” or fiancée.

What is the significance of Kurtz dying words?

What does Mr Kurtz symbolize?

Mr. Kurtz, one of the leading characters, the other being Marlow, the narrator of the soty, represents many symbols in the novel. Firstly, he symbolizes the greed and the commercial mentality of the white people of the western countries. Secondly, he symbolizes the white man’s love of power.

Why did Kurtz go insane?

When he rose to power as the “God-King” of the Montagnards, Kurtz was treated truly like a godlike king, using his extensive military training to form an army of followers and soldiers around him, eventually becoming a philosopher of war, reading poetry and quotes from the Holy Bible, leading him to be seen as truly …

What is the horror the horror to which Kurtz refers?

The horror!” (Part III, Page 12) During his time spent in Africa, Kurtz becomes corrupt and writes the words “Exterminate all the brutes!” Here he refers to his own and his comrade’s brutality in Africa, which was carried out in the name of progress and civilization.

What was Kurtz’s original intention for writing the paper?

While Kurtz’s original intention for writing the paper was to focus on altruistic forms of imperialism, his true beliefs and natural inclination are emphasized in the final statement regarding the extermination of the Natives.

What was Kurtz’s report called?

Marlow, the narrator of Joseph Conrad ‘s novella The Heart of Darkness, writes that Kurtz had made a report for the International Society for the Suppression of Savage Customs. The title of this organization implies that its intent was benevolence but that it was perhaps sinister in its practices.

What does Kurtz say about himself in the end?

In a paper that is supposedly altruistic, or intended to help the local people, Kurtz seems to forget himself in the end, and his true nature comes out when he writes that all the natives should be killed. This paper reveals that Kurtz is like the devil, as he covers his evil intent with eloquence.

How does Marlow describe Kurtz’s report to the International Society?

Marlow recalls reading Kurtz ‘s report to the International Society for the Suppression of Savage Customs and begins by commenting on the paper’s eloquence. As Marlow reiterates the first paragraph, he mentions that in hindsight the paper strikes him as ominous. Kurtz begins by writing that the white Europeans should…