How do you fix a lateral malleolus fracture?

Lateral malleolus fractures are stable ankle fractures, and you usually don’t need surgery. They can happen when you take an awkward step and roll your ankle. To treat these ankle fractures, aim to reduce pain and swelling. Use ice, keep your ankle elevated, and take anti-inflammatory medication if you need it.

How do you fix a lateral malleolus fracture?

Lateral malleolus fractures are stable ankle fractures, and you usually don’t need surgery. They can happen when you take an awkward step and roll your ankle. To treat these ankle fractures, aim to reduce pain and swelling. Use ice, keep your ankle elevated, and take anti-inflammatory medication if you need it.

How do you treat a medial malleolus fracture?

Less severe fractures will be treated by conservative (nonsurgical) treatment. You may be treated with a short leg cast or a removable brace. If there’s any damage to nerves or blood vessels, an orthopedic specialist will need to reset the damaged bones as soon as possible.

When should a posterior malleolus fracture be fixed?

The treatment of ankle fractures with the involvement of posterior malleolus remains a subject of debate. Most authors recommend fixation when the fracture comprises >25% of the articular surface.

Does lateral malleolus fracture require surgery?

Lateral malleolus fractures are often stable and can be treated without surgery. When a lateral malleolus fracture is accompanied by a sprain of the ligament on the inside of the ankle (the deltoid ligament), your injury may be unstable and may require surgery.

Do medial malleolus fracture need surgery?

Not all medial malleolar fractures require surgery. The bone will heal with or without surgery in around six to eight weeks. The purpose of surgery is to stabilize the bone in its proper position while the bone is healing.

What causes a posterior malleolus fracture?

Several mechanisms for posterior malleolar fracture have been proposed: avulsion by the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament,[35–37] pressure from the externally rotating talus,[35,37] pressure from the lateral malleolar fragment, and axial loading from the talus.

Where is a posterior malleolus fracture?

Posterior malleolus fractures are fractures of the posterior segment of the tibial plafond and a common occurrence in the setting of bimalleolar or trimalleolar ankle fractures.