Is Laryngopharyngeal reflux serious?

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is one of the most common and important disorders of upper airway inflammation. It causes significant impairment to quality of life, and can predict serious laryngeal and oesophageal pathology, yet it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated.

Is Laryngopharyngeal reflux serious?

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is one of the most common and important disorders of upper airway inflammation. It causes significant impairment to quality of life, and can predict serious laryngeal and oesophageal pathology, yet it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated.

Can Laryngopharyngeal reflux be cured?

LPR can develop in infants and adults. It is treatable.

How is Laryngopharyngeal reflux treated?

How is laryngopharyngeal reflux treated?

  1. Follow a bland diet (low acid levels, low in fat, not spicy).
  2. Eat frequent, small meals.
  3. Lose weight.
  4. Avoid the use of alcohol, tobacco and caffeine.
  5. Do not eat food less than 2 hours before bedtime.
  6. Raise the head of your bed before sleeping.
  7. Avoid clearing your throat.

What causes Laryngopharyngeal reflux?

What causes LPR? LPR most commonly results from conditions that enable reflux of stomach contents back into the esophagus such as a hiatal hernia or increased abdominal pressure. However, LPR can also be due to a motility problem in the esophagus, such as achalasia.

What does Laryngopharyngeal reflux feel like?

Adults with LPR often complain that the back of their throat has a bitter taste, a sensation of burning, or something stuck. Some patients have hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, throat clearing, and difficulty with the sensation of drainage from the back of the nose (postnasal drip).

How long does it take to heal from LPR?

Although most patients show improvement of symptoms within 3 months, the resolution of symptoms and laryngeal findings generally takes 6 months.

What is the best medication for Laryngopharyngeal reflux?

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective medicines for the treatment of LPR.

What foods should I avoid with Laryngopharyngeal reflux?

Foods that people with laryngopharyngeal reflux should avoid include spicy, fried and fatty foods; citrus fruits; tomatoes; chocolate; peppermint; cheese; and garlic. Foods that contain caffeine, carbonated beverages and alcohol also can worsen symptoms.

Does omeprazole help LPR?

Conclusions: The results of our trial suggest that omeprazole 20 mg OD for 8 weeks was effective in reducing signs and symptoms of both LPR and CRS, although in most patients still present at the end of the trial.

What doctor treats LPR?

The specialist who most often treats people with LPR is the otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat physician). If your doctor thinks that you could have LPR, he or she will probably perform a throat exam first and look at the voice box and the lower throat.