What scales to use on Take the A train?

For improvisation, use the D Lydian dominant scale over the D7, the fourth mode of the A melodic minor scale, which is closely related to C major. It is said that the first two melody notes over the D7 sound like a train horn…

What scales to use on Take the A train?

For improvisation, use the D Lydian dominant scale over the D7, the fourth mode of the A melodic minor scale, which is closely related to C major. It is said that the first two melody notes over the D7 sound like a train horn…

Is Take the A Train major or minor?

The tonality of the song is established as C minor. A darker version of A Train’s C major. This chord could be written out more fully as an Ab13(#11), which takes the lydian dominant scale.

What is the melody in Take the A train?

Take the A Train features the use of a G note (as a held note) for the first pitch of the piece, followed by another rather long G# note in bars 3 and 4. You might be wondering what that G# has to do with the key of C major.

What is the tempo of take the A train?

Take the “A” Train is a song by Duke Ellington with a tempo of 94 BPM. It can also be used double-time at 188 BPM. The track runs 5 minutes and 32 seconds long with a C key and a major mode. It has low energy and is somewhat danceable with a time signature of 4 beats per bar.

What instruments are used in Take the A train?

Duke Ellington, piano, directing: Wallace Jones, first trumpet; Ray Nance, trumpet; Rex Stewart, cornet; Lawrence Brown, first trombone; Joseph Nanton, trombone; Juan Tizol, valve trombone; Otto Hardwick, first alto saxophone; Johnny Hodges, alto saxophone; Ben Webster and Barney Bigard, tenor saxophones; Harry Carney.

Why is take the A train jazz?

The title refers to the, at the time, new A train service in New York City. Ellington’s son, Mercer, recalled that he found A Train in the trash. Strayhorn originally thought it sounded too much like a Fletcher Henderson arrangement.

What chord is A train whistle?

This whistle produced a bright G-major 6th chord (GBDEG) and, again, was heavily imitated, copies being made by many different railroads. The most popular American chime train whistle was the three-note version.

What is the structure of Take the A train?

Based loosely on the chordal structure of “Exactly Like You”, the song combines the propulsive swing of the 1940s-era Ellington band with the confident sophistication of Ellington and the black elite who inhabited Sugar Hill in Harlem. The tune is in AABA form, in the key of C, with each section being a lyric couplet.

What are the take the a train chords?

This next Take The A Train chords study is a pianistic way to approach comping that uses 3 note voicings on strings 1, 2, and 4 of the guitar. Hybrid picking or finger style right hand techniquesare recommend to play through this Take The A Train chords study.

Where did the song take the a train come from?

Strayhorn’s 1939 “Take The A Train” actually took its A section chords from the 1930 standard “Exactly Like You” by Jimmy McHugh. And Jobim penned the Brazilian classic “So Danco Samba” in 1962, the same year as “The Girl From Ipanema,” using the same A section chords.

What songs use the take the a section?

Besides being a great tune in it’s own right, the A section of the Take The A Train chords is used in countless other tunes. Songs such as The Girl From Ipanema, So Danco Samba and Exactly Like You all use the A section Take The A Train chords.

What are the best chord studies for beginners?

This first take the A train chords study uses 4thvoicings, drop 2 chordsand dominant 7b9 chords. Mixing up different chords is an effective way to create movement and interest within your chord solosand comping. Each bar in this chord study starts with a 4thvoicing then goes to a drop 2 chord.