What are crimper pliers?

Crimping Pliers are used to close 2mm-3mm crimp beads and crimp tubes smoothly and unobtrusively. Crimps are small beads or tubes used to hold wire or string ends firmly so that the design will not unravel and clasps can be attached.

What are crimper pliers?

Crimping Pliers are used to close 2mm-3mm crimp beads and crimp tubes smoothly and unobtrusively. Crimps are small beads or tubes used to hold wire or string ends firmly so that the design will not unravel and clasps can be attached.

How do I identify a Molex connector?

The Molex connector is one where the male/female terminology is a bit odd. The female connector is usually found on the end of a cable, and it slips inside of a plastic shell which surrounds the male pins on the male connector.

How to unplug a Molex connector?

Insert a new connector pin into the appropriate slot on a wire crimper.

  • Slide the end of the wire into connector pin. Take your wire and push the end of it into the connector pin being held by the crimper.
  • Squeeze the handle of the crimper to attach the pin to the wire.
  • Push the wire into the correct slot on the connector to reinstall it.
  • Do I need a Molex connector?

    Safe, yes. Usable, not necessarily. A Molex to SATA connector should be fine for most HDDs and DVD Drives but it may not be sufficient for more modern SSDs and BluRay drives. The SATA power connector includes a 3.3 volt rail as well as the traditional 5 volt and 12 volt rails.

    How to install and remove Molex connectors?

    to the model number provided. The proper fit will avoid damage and improper replacement/installation. Hold the Molex connector so the rows are horizontal and insert the tool from the contact side. Ensure the prongs are between the pin and plastic connector body on both sides. Next, push the tool as far as it will go into the connector.

    How to use Molex crimper?

    Termination–Crimping. In crimping, a metal sleeve is secured to a conductor by mechanically crimping the sleeve with pliers, presses, or automated crimping machines. Note that the conductor is crimped in two places – on the wire and on its insulator. The latter is called a strain relief.